Wine Woes and Water Stress: How Non-Essential Industries Cope with a Changing Climate

Michael Larrick  ·  September 21, 2018 Image: A concrete lined irrigation ditch runs between grape vines in South Africa’s Western Cape. Flickr user Jason Jones, Creative Commons. In discussions about water shortage, the topic of the human right to water seems to be a key topic of debate. Different countries approach the question of whether individuals should … Continue reading “Wine Woes and Water Stress: How Non-Essential Industries Cope with a Changing Climate”

Diverted River Sustains California Wine Country, but It’s Killing Salmon

Utility PG&E’s Potter Valley Project includes two dams on the Eel River that are up for relicensing. Water diversions into the Russian River for power generation are in jeopardy as salmon and steelhead remain at risk of extinction. Written by Matt Weiser Published on Jan. 29, 2018 Read time Approx. 6 minutes Few people outside Northern California have heard of the … Continue reading “Diverted River Sustains California Wine Country, but It’s Killing Salmon”

In Napa Valley, Vineyards and Conservationists Battle for the Hills

The steady expansion of vineyards in California’s premier wine-growing region is moving uphill into oak and other woodlands and is adversely affecting fish and wildlife. Other wine areas, from Oregon’s Willamette Valley to Mendoza in Argentina, are facing similar issues. By Alastair Bland • May 11, 2017 Kellie Anderson stands in the understory of a … Continue reading “In Napa Valley, Vineyards and Conservationists Battle for the Hills”

Sapping the Well

By Alastair Bland Tyler Heck remembers the summer days that often sent him down the hill from his family’s home off Erland Road and into the cool waters of Van Buren Creek for relief. He remembers diving into the water and swimming, even in July and August. It was the 1980s. Heck, now 32, says … Continue reading “Sapping the Well”

California Set to Regulate Carcinogen in Water for Decades

Hundreds of drinking-water wells across California’s San Joaquin Valley have been found to contain 1,2,3-trichloropropane, a likely human carcinogen. This month, the state has taken a big step forward in regulating the chemical. Carlos Arias is asked by many residents in the small town of Del Rey, California, if the water is safe to drink. … Continue reading “California Set to Regulate Carcinogen in Water for Decades”

Lawsuit Alleges Wineries Failed To Warn Consumers Of Arsenic-Tainted Wine

February 27, 2017 In April of last year we posted an interview televised on Ring of Fire about the high levels of inorganic arsenic in wines: (http://winewaterwatch.org/2016/04/first-they-found-toxic-glyphosate-in-wine-and-now-arsenic/) and noted that a lawsuit was going to be filed. Wine labeling laws let the wine producers hide alot of additives, arsenic being one for color, smell and flavor … Continue reading “Lawsuit Alleges Wineries Failed To Warn Consumers Of Arsenic-Tainted Wine”

New Era on Tap

by Stett Holbrook December 07, 2016 Sonoma and Napa counties respond differently to new groundwater law Call it a tale of two counties. A new state law requires that local governments regulate groundwater for the first time. Sonoma County has begun a lengthy process to create long-term sustainable groundwater management plans for its at-risk water … Continue reading “New Era on Tap”

Researchers determine vineyards adversely affect soil quality

July 14, 2016, UBC Okanagan [British Columbia] UBC biologists are digging under vineyards to see if the Okanagan’s grape industry is affecting soil quality. Miranda Hart, an associate professor of biology at UBC’s Okanagan campus, her PhD candidate Taylor Holland, along with Agriculture Canada research scientist Pat Bowen, has spent the better part of three … Continue reading “Researchers determine vineyards adversely affect soil quality”

Mike Benziger | Water Wizard

vommag July 31, 2015 Vol.1 Issue 2 Story: David Bolling Photos: Steven Krause Winemaking is a kind of alchemy because, at a fundamental level, it involves turning water into wine. A lot of water. UC Davis professor Larry Williams studied a test plot of chardonnay grapes in Carneros and calculated that irrigated vines required a … Continue reading “Mike Benziger | Water Wizard”

Under the influence? How the wine industry dominates Sonoma County election campaigns

February 19, 2016 by Sonoma Valley Sun A Sun exclusive by By Will Parrish For at least two decades, Sonoma County officials have sided with the wine industry in nearly every major political dispute. The reason? The industry dominates the county’s economy – and financially dominates county election campaigns. Last spring, Sonoma County supervisors Efren … Continue reading “Under the influence? How the wine industry dominates Sonoma County election campaigns”